ARMSTRONG TELEVISION & WIRELESS

Posted by STEVE M on

 

Armstrong Wireless and Television Ltd was started in 1932 by Claude Jackson in Camden Town, London.  He named the company after  his favourite car, the Armstrong Siddeley and abbreviated the name to just Armstrong.

Following a period of business expansion, the company moved to larger premises in Holloway, London and commenced manufacture of televisions using a new 9-inch tube, however, WW2 put paid to the commercialisation of that line.

During the second world war the factory was used for making the 'J Tube' - a vital part of incendiary devices. They also repaired radios and produced  public address systems for factories

Once the war ended, the munitions machinery was removed and post-war production by Armstrong included radios for ships as well as TV sets.  All of these products were characterised as  high grade consumer radios, amplifers, and tuners,  with many  "chassis only" units being sold to hifi enthusiasts who wished to upgrade their equipment but not their furniture!

During the 1950's the audio and ”high fidelity“ market took over from the traditional radio and radogram market and this prompted a name change in 1963  to Armstrong Audio  Ltd.

During the 1960's and 1970's,  Armstrong produced their best known ranges, the 500 and 600 series and sold many thousands of units, both through specialist Hi-Fi dealers and the new ‘discount warehouses’ prevalent on Tottenham Court Road and thence throughout the UK as Comet gained hold on the high streets. 

 Armstrong ceased manufacturing in 1980 and sold their Holloway factory  but continued design and development of the 700 range, however a lack of capital to secure manufacturing facilities meant that the idea was stillborn.  

Following a further name change to Armstrong Hi-Fi and Video Services,  they continued to provide  contract service and maintenance to a range customers from their Walthamstow premises until their eventual closure in the late 80s.
 


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